Water tour route ‘Two stadiums of the Northern Capital of Russia’

The water tour route is dedicated to the history of Saint Petersburg football stadiums. Starting from the historic ‘Petrovsky’ stadium, the route goes along the navigating path of the Malaya Neva (Little Neva) to the Gulf of Finland passing such noble buildings of the XXI century as a new colossal stadium ‘Gazprom-Arena’ and a mesmerizing skyscraper ‘Lakhta-center’.

 

The route starts from the berth near Senatskaya Ploshchad (Senate Square) and runs along the navigation path of the Malaya Neva (Little Neva River) to the Gulf of Finland. The return route to the berth along the ship navigating channel bypassing the Marine Façade and a unique structure - the central part of the Western High-Speed Diameter under the cable bridge. In the course of the route tourists will have a unique opportunity to see all football stadiums of the city founded on the Neva River from the waters. 

  • alternative view 1 ,
  • squares 2 ,
  • arenas 2 ,
  • sea and river ports 1
Senate Square

Senate Square

St. Petersurg, Senatskaya ploshchad

One of the oldest squares in Saint Petersburg

Senate Square began to form in 1704, initially being a part of the glacis near the Admiralty. The admiralty was conceived to be not only the shipyard, but also the fortress. That is why there was a great need in free space near it. The western boundary of the square was defined (marked) with a clay-walled revenue house of Prince (Knyaz) Menshikov which is situated at the corner of Angliyskaya Naberezhnaya (the English Embankment) in the mid of 1710-s. 

In 1710, the first wooden building of the St. Isaac’s Church was built here, on the bank of the Neva River. It served as a religious place for servants in the Admiralty and for sailors. The marriage ceremony of Peter I and Catherine I was held there. 

Since1717, the Admiralteysky Canal washed the southern border of the future Senate Square. Initially, it used to be a place to stock construction timber, later, though, people transported timber via the canal from New Holland Island.   

In 1720 another short canal was dug from the Admiralteysky Canal perpendicular to the side of the Neva River, along the western border of the square, where the tarring loft was located. Later, the building for the Synod was constructed at the site of the former tarring loft. Embranchment from the Admiralteysky Canal contributed to fire protection, because the tarring loft put the shipyard at risk. 

The Decree of June 30, 1720 adopted by Peter I states: ‘to build a spinning house behind the courtyard of His Serene Highness the Prince and give the street from that courtyard’.  So, the decree defined not only the place of the Kanatny Dvor (the Cable Yard) located on the bank of the Admiralteysky Canal but also the direction of Galernaya Street, which runs from the square. 

In 1727 a floating pontoon Isaakievsky (Isaac) bridge was launched from the square to the other bank of the Neva River. 

In 1730s, at the site of the wooden St. Isaac’s Church a big stone temple was built. It was situated almost at the place where the monument of Peter the Great (also known as the ‘Bronze Horseman’) is now located. It is noteworthy that the temple not only bears the name of the Saint on whose day the founder of St. Petersburg was born, but its first location also coincided with the installation site of the statue of Peter the Great. The first official name of the city square was associated with the temple – Isaakievskaya (St. Isaac’s Square). This name was assigned to the square on April 20, 1738. Then the name was written with one letter ‘a’ – Isakievskaya. However, the name of the square didn’t take root and was used only in official documents. Later, people called this way the area to the south of the modern St. Isaac’s Cathedral. 

After Prince (Knyaz) Menshikov’s death, his land plot was assigned to the vice-chancellor Osterman, and in 1744 to the chancellor Bestuzhev-Rumin. For the new owner of the house a new palace with beautiful fronts in baroque style was built. After enthronement of Catherine II, the Senate moved here from the building of Twelve Collegia. In 1760, under the reign of Catherine II the location of St. Isaac’s Cathedral was changed. The basis of the temple, being grounded on the bank of the Neva River, was very unstable, so there was nothing to do but move it away from the river. It is then that the cathedral was based to the south of the square, on the bank of the Admiralteysky Canal. The Bronze Horseman statue, created be the French sculptor Falconet was unveiled on the square in 1782. Since that moment the square was referred to as Petrovskaya Square (in honor of Peter the Great).

At the end of the XVIII century, on the site of the former tarring loft a new house appeared, which at first belonged to The Ustevi merchant family and later to the Kustovnikovs merchant family. 

The part of the Admiralteysky canal adjacent to Senate square was enclosed in a pipe at the very beginning of the XIX century. The searching for the man to carry out this work was held in summer 1804. At that time, an arm of the canal towards the Neva River was covered up with sand.  

In 1820, an abutment was built right near the entrance to the Isaakievsky (St. Isaac’s) bridge. 

The final molding of the eastern part of Senate square was marked with the construction of a new Admiralty building upon the project of Andreyan Zacharov in 1820s.  In 1834 the construction of an impressive building of the Senate and Synod was completed. 

On December 14, 1825 regiments that refused to take an oath to the new Emperor (Tsar) of the Russian Empire Nicholas I lined up at the foot of the monument to Peter the Great. There were about 3000 rebels who were surrounded by the troops that have already taken the oath. The rebellion was crushed. This remarkable event took place against the background of the construction of the fourth building of St. Isaac’s cathedral designed by Auguste Richard de Monferrand. By 1858 the construction works had been completed.  Since then, the architectural design of Senate Square has not been changed.

In 1874 Senate square became part of Alexandrovsky Park which was made near the Admiralty building. The Bronze Horseman was surrounded by green lawns and beautiful flowerbeds.  Gardeners planted oaks from the side of St. Isaac’s Cathedral and designed a rock garden between the monument and the Admiralty. In 1890, however the part of the garden near the Bronze Horseman was removed. This place was cobbled and rebuilt into square.

In 1925, in order to mark the centenary of the Decembrist revolt, the square was given a new name – Decembrists’ Square. On July 31, 2008 the square received back its old name – Senatskaya (Senate) Square.  

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Petrovsky Stadium

Petrovsky Stadium

Saint Petersurg, Petrovsky Ostrov 2

The Petrovsky Stadium is the home of FC ‘Zenit’ with a capacity of 21504 people. Its history dates back to the pre-war period, but in 1942 the stadium was completely demolished by shelling and bombardment. Later it was dismantled and used for wood. After the reconstruction the stadium took its current appearance in 1961. 

During the water tour, there is a possibility to take part in the sightseeing around the stadium which includes the following: a walk in the football arena and a storytelling about the remarkable events for the stadium as well as for FC ‘Zenit’. During FIFA World Cup 2018 Petrovsky Stadium was used as a training ground.  

Petrovsky stadium, the main football arena in Saint Petersburg in the past, is located on the island of the same name. 

Since 1992 the stadium bears a name ‘Petrovsky’. In 1994, the stadium hosted the Goodwill Games. Later, in 1996 Petrovsky Stadium hosted the championship match of the Russian Cup between FC ‘Spartak’ and ‘Alania Vladikavkaz’. Petrovsky stadium was also a ground for football matches dedicated to the centenary of Russian football (football matches between Yugoslavian and Russian teams, teams of Saint Petersburg and Moscow, Russian and French veteran teams).  The matches of FIFA Women’s World Cup were held at the stadium.  

 

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The stadium "Gazprom Arena"

The stadium "Gazprom Arena"

Saint Petersburg, Football alley, 1

Gazprom Arena Stadium is situated on the former site of Kirov Stadium, the construction work of which started in 1932. The stadium opened its doors on July 30, 1950.  

During the 2017 FIFA Confederations Cup and FIFA World Cup 2018 the stadium was referred to as ‘Saint Petersburg’. 

The architectural plan designed by Japanese architect Kise that implied that the size of the hill as well as pavilions of Kirov stadium remain unchanged was chosen for the construction the football arena. In addition to it, the monument to Kirov and ticket offices were also intact but undergone renovation work. 

There were some smart design solutions such as the sliding football field which allowed the arena to host non-football events on the concrete foundation and a sliding roof based on eight masts, 286 meters in diameter above the stands of the stadium. 

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The Lakhta Center is an 86-story multifunctional complex on the shore of the Gulf of Finland. The height of the building is 462 meters. There is a beautiful observation deck located on 83-86 floors available for all the guests of the city. The café is about to open in the Lakhta center soon. The modern center became the new headquarters of Russian energy company Gazprom that actually was an initiator of construction work of the building in 2012. 

Many residents of the city dream of visiting a free public panorama observation deck which is located on the 86th floor at the height of 357 meters. The site will be open for public after the building works are over. Visitors can use a high-speed elevator with a speed 8 meters per second, and the lifting time will not exceed one minute. This is a paid service, though.

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Passenger port of Saint Petersburg "Marine Facade"

Passenger port of Saint Petersburg "Marine Facade"

St.Petersburg, ul. Bereg Nevskoi Guby, 1

Passenger Port of Saint Petersburg ‘Marine Façade’ is located on Vasilievsky Island. The port complex includes four cruise terminals (three cruise terminals and one cruise-ferry terminal) and seven berths.  

The imperative need for construction of a new marine passenger terminal proceeded from inability of the existing Marine Station to accommodate vessels longer than 200 meters. As a result, large passenger ships arrived at the Commercial Sea Port of Saint Petersburg. In 2002, Saint Petersburg City Administration suggested to build a modern complex to accommodate vessels. 

In September 2008 the first part of the Passenger Port of Saint Petersburg ‘Marine Facade’ that consisted of one marine cruise terminal and two berths was opened. On September 10, the Passenger Port accommodated the first cruise ship ‘Costa Mediterranea’. The second phase of the port started working in 2010 and included one cruise terminal and one combined cruise-ferry terminal as well as three berths. The construction of the Passenger Port of St. Petersburg was completed in 2011 with the construction of another cruise station and two berths.

On May 27, 2011, on Saint Petersburg City Day, a solemn ceremony to give the first and the only specialized Passenger Port of Saint Petersburg ‘Marine Façade’ in the Northwestern Region of Russia over to the city was held with participation of the City Governor Valentina Matvienko. 

 

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The Western High-Speed Diameter is one of the main construction projects of Saint Petersburg in recent years. Rising 35 meters above the ship navigating path, the central section of the highway attracts tourists’ attention with sloping bridge pylons reaching straight to heaven at the height of 125 meters. According to the authors of the engineering project, bridge pylons dredge up images of the bridge openings in the Northern capital of Russia.  

The construction of sloping bridge pylons was one of the most difficult and critical phases of building activity. Construction workers had to be very skilled and experienced in order to meet the required geometry of the project. Moreover, geometrical position and inclination were strictly measured and controlled after each stage of concreting.

Nowadays, the bridge across the ship navigation path is becoming another architectural landmark of Saint Petersburg.

 

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Senate Square

Senate Square

St. Petersurg, Senatskaya ploshchad

One of the oldest squares in Saint Petersburg

Senate Square began to form in 1704, initially being a part of the glacis near the Admiralty. The admiralty was conceived to be not only the shipyard, but also the fortress. That is why there was a great need in free space near it. The western boundary of the square was defined (marked) with a clay-walled revenue house of Knyaz Menshikov which is situated at the corner of Angliyskaya Naberezhnaya (the English Embankment) in the mid of 1710-s. 

In 1710, the first wooden building of the St. Isaac’s Church was built here, on the bank of the Neva River. It served as a religious place for servants in the Admiralty and for sailors. The marriage ceremony of Peter I and Catherine I was held there. 

Since1717, the Admiralteysky Canal washed the southern border of the future Senate Square. Initially, it used to be a place to stock construction timber, later, though, people transported timber via the canal from New Holland Island.   

In 1720 another short canal was dug from the Admiralteysky Canal perpendicular to the side of the Neva River, along the western border of the square, where the tarring loft was located. Later, the building for the Synod was constructed at the site of the former tarring loft. Embranchment from the Admiralteysky Canal contributed to fire protection, because the tarring loft put the shipyard at risk. 

The Decree of June 30, 1720 adopted by Peter I states: ‘to build a spinning house behind the courtyard of His Serene Highness the Prince and give the street from that courtyard’.  So, the decree defined not only the place of the Kanatny Dvor (the Cable Yard) located on the bank of the Admiralteysky Canal but also the direction of Galernaya Street, which runs from the square. 

In 1727 a floating pontoon Isaakievsky (Isaac) bridge was launched from the square to the other bank of the Neva River. 

In 1730s, at the site of the wooden St. Isaac’s Church a big stone temple was built. It was situated almost at the place where the monument of Peter the Great (also known as the ‘Bronze Horseman’) is now located. It is noteworthy that the temple not only bears the name of the Saint on whose day the founder of St. Petersburg was born, but its first location also coincided with the installation site of the statue of Peter the Great. The first official name of the city square was associated with the temple – Isaakievskaya (St.Isaac’s Square). This name was assigned to the square on April 20, 1738. Then the name was written with one letter ‘a’ – Isakievskaya. However, the name of the square didn’t take root and was used only in official documents. Later, people called this way the area to the south of the modern St. Isaac’s Cathedral. 

After Prince (Knyaz) Menshikov’s death, his land plot was assigned to the vice-chancellor Osterman, and in 1744 to the chancellor Bestuzhev-Rumin. For the new owner of the house a new palace with beautiful fronts in baroque style was built. After enthronement of Catherine II, the Senate moved here from the building of Twelve Collegia. In 1760, under the reign of Catherine II the location of St. Isaac’s Cathedral was changed. The basis of the temple, being grounded on the bank of the Neva River, was very unstable, so there was nothing to do but move it away from the river. It is then that the cathedral was based to the south of the square, on the bank of the Admiralteysky Canal. The Bronze Horseman statue, created be the French sculptor Falconet was unveiled on the square in 1782. Since that moment the square was referred to as Petrovskaya Square (in honor of Peter the Great).

At the end of the XVIII century, on the site of the former tarring loft a new house appeared, which at first belonged to The Ustevi merchant family and later to the Kustovnikovs merchant family. 

The part of the Admiralteysky canal adjacent to Senate square was enclosed in a pipe at the very beginning of the XIX century. The searching for the man to carry out this work was held in summer 1804. At that time, an arm of the canal towards the Neva River was covered up with sand.  

In 1820, an abutment was built right near the entrance to the Isaakievsky (St. Isaac’s) bridge. 

The final molding of the eastern part of Senate square was marked with the construction of a new Admiralty building upon the project of Andreyan Zacharov in 1820s.  In 1834 the construction of an impressive building of the Senate and Synod was completed. 

On December 14, 1825 regiments that refused to take an oath to the new Emperor (Tsar) of the Russian Empire Nicholas I lined up at the foot of the monument to Peter the Great. There were about 3000 rebels who were surrounded by the troops that have already taken the oath. The rebellion was crushed. This remarkable event took place against the background of the construction of the fourth building of St. Isaac’s cathedral designed by Auguste Richard de Monferrand. By 1858 the construction works had been completed.  Since then, the architectural design of Senate Square has not been changed.

In 1874 Senate square became part of Alexandrovsky Park which was made near the Admiralty building. The Bronze Horseman was surrounded by green lawns and beautiful flowerbeds.  Gardeners planted oaks from the side of St. Isaac’s Cathedral and designed a rock garden between the monument and the Admiralty. In 1890, however the part of the garden near the Bronze Horseman was removed. This place was cobbled and rebuilt into square.

In 1925, in order to mark the centenary of the Decembrist revolt, the square was given a new name – Decembrists’ Square. On July 31, 2008 the square received back its old name – Senatskaya (Senate) Square. 

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