Imperial Petersburg

An excursion water tour will show you the Northern capital in all its splendor and grandeur

We suggest that you immerse yourself in the ceremonial atmosphere of the Imperial Petersburg and go accompanied by an experienced guide for a one-hour water excursion around St. Petersburg on a comfortable boat. This tour shows the Northern capital in all its glory and grandeur. You will learn how the city has been changing from the moment of its founfation to the present days. Our vessel will follow the main rivers and canals of the city: Neva, Fontanka, Moika, Winter Canal and return to the Neva.

You will have an opportunity to appreciate the beauty of the ceremonial views: embankments, architectural ensembles, defensive and religious buildings, palace complexes, admire the Palace Bridge, the Spit of the Vasilyevsky Island, the Bronze Horseman, the Kunstkamera, the Admiralty, the Hermitage, the Peter and Paul Fortress and the Summer Garden.

  • museums 2 ,
  • berths 4 ,
  • monuments 1 ,
  • bridges 1 ,
  • palaces 1
11 km, 638 m
The State Hermitage Museum

The State Hermitage Museum

Saint Petersburg, Dvortsovaya ploshchad, 2

The collection of the State Hermitage includes more than three million works of art and artefacts of the world culture

The State Hermitage Museum is one of the largest artistic and cultural and historical museums in Russia and one of the largest in the world.The museum starts its history from collections of works of art which were gained by Russian empress Catherine II in private capacity.

The main expositions of the State Hermitage are placed in the Main Museum Complex, which is situated in the historical centre of Saint Petersburg. It is represented by  the Winter Palace, which is a former emperor's residence, Small Hermitage, Old Hermitage and New Hermitage, and also Hermitage Theatre.

In the Main Museum Complex of the State Hermitage are presented the monuments of culture and arts of the ancient world, Europe, Russia, the East, archaeological and numismatic collections. In the  Hermitage collection there are two paintings by Leonardo da Vinci and sculpture by Michelangelo, which can be found nowhere else in Russia, as well as the  largest collection of Rembrandt's paintings outside Netherlands.

The expositions of the State Hermitage Museum are also located in the General Staff, the Winter Palace of Peter I, Menshikov Palace, the Museum of the Imperial Porcelain Factory, Staraya Derevnya Restoration and Storage Centre.

Ticket price — 600 roubles

300  roubles – entry ticket to one of the Hermitage branches (Winter Palace of Peter the Great, Menshikov Palace, the Museum of the Imperial Porcelain Factory, Staraya Derevnya Restoration and Storage Centre)

The third Thursday of each month is a day of free entrance to the museum for all individual visitors (with free tickets).

Free entrance: preschool children, school children, students.

506 m
2
Trinity Bridge

Trinity Bridge

St. Petersburg, Troitsky most

Trinity Bridge connects Kamennoostrovsky Prospect with Suvorovskaya Square

The Trinity Bridge was opened in 1903 as part of the celebrations of St. Petersburg's 200th anniversary. It was the third permanent bridge, after Blagoveshchensky Bridge and Liteiny Bridge, to be laid across the River Neva, running form just north of the Field of Mars on the left bank of the river to the Petrograd Side next to the Peter and Paul Fortress. Measuring 582 meters, it is the second longest bridge in the city, one of the busiest, and also one of the most beautiful thanks to its spectacularly ornate Art Nouveau design.

The bridge's name refers to the Trinity Cathedral, which once stood by the river on the Petrograd Side. The name was changed to Bridge of Equality in 1918, and the Cathedral was destroyed soon after. In 1934, the bridge was renamed to honor Sergei Kirov, revolutionary and Bolshevik leader of Petrograd. The original name was only restored in 1999.

683 m
3
Summer Garden Berth

Summer Garden Berth

St. Petersburg, Dvortsovaya embankment

Situated near cultural and leisure sights of St.Petersburg such as Summer garden and Summer Palace of Peter the Great

None
354 m
4
Anichkov Palace

Anichkov Palace

St. Petersburg, Nevsky pr., 39 A

Anichkov Palace is a former imperial palace at the intersection of Nevsky prospekt and the Fontanka River. The oldest building on Nevsky Prospekt that survived until today, it took its name from the nearby Anichkov Bridge

The construction of the Palace commenced in 1741, under the orders of the Empress Elizabeth I who just started reign the state after the latest palace coup. The project of the various-story building, the form of which was similar to letter ‘H’ (‘N’ in Cyrillic alphabet) was developed by one of the most renowned architects in the Russian capital Mikhail Zemtsov. The building works were finished in baroque style upon the guidance of Bartolomeo Rastrelli.

Back then, Fontanka used to be the outskirts of the city, Nevsky Prospekt was a branch trial. So, it was necessary to erect a mesmerizing construction that could adorn the entrance to the capital. There was a special channel with a small pond at the entrance to the palace dug out near Fontanka. That accounts for the unique location of the palace which is situated sideways to Nevsky Prospect. The palace with its beautiful garden, fountains and flowerbeds which resembled the Palace in Peterhof, was presented by the Empress Elizabeth I to her favorite (and likely spouse), Aleksey Razumovsky. Thereafter, the palace used to be a nice wedding present for aristocrats. After the Empress Catherine II’s enthronement, the palace reverted to the crown – the Empress bought the Anichkov Palace from Alexey’s brother Kirill and later donated the palace to her closest favorite Prince Grigory Potemkin. Another part of her present was 100 thousand roubles for fitting out the palace ‘to his own taste’. As a result, the palace undergone reconstruction in 1776-1778 supervised by the architect Starov and turned into a great example of the classical architecture in a strict sense. The building was renewed and considerably altered: for instance, various-story structure as well as stucco decorations were eliminated, and the pond was covered up with sand.

At the end of the XVIII century the palace was restored to the crown and adapted to accommodate Her Imperial Majesty's Cabinet. Later, though, the Imperial Cabinet occupied the new building which was erected on Fontanka Embankment along Nevsky Prospect by Quarenghi. Quarenghi’s construction obstructed the overview of the palace from Anichkov Bridge.

Alexander I bestowed the palace on his sister, Grand Duchess Ekaterina Pavlovna of Russia and her groom Prince Friedrich Ludwig of Mecklenburg-Schwerin as a wedding present. The future Russian Emperor Nicholas I moved into the palace in 1817. At that time, Carlo Rossi supervised architectural re-planning and reconstruction of the interiors of the palace. He also instilled the palace and its garden into a grand architectural ensemble on Alexandrinsky Square (now known as Ostrovskogo Square). After Nicholas I ascended the throne, he often stayed at Anichkov Palace. It was also a place where royal balls and banquets were held. In 1837, at the year when the Winter Palace was being reconstructed after the fire, august family was living in the Anichkov Palace for a while. After the Emperor’s death in 1855, the palace was renamed ‘Nikolaevsky’ but locals kept on calling it ‘Anichkov’. The palace was home for the future Emperor Alexander II, the son of Nicholas I who was educated and brought up by the Russian poet Zhukovsky, Pushkin’s friend. Speaking of, Zhukovsky had his own flat in the palace. He also taught Russian to the Empress Aleksandra Fyodorovna. On October 23, 1836 the poet Alexander Pushkin was invited to Imperial audience, where Nicholas I insisted on his refraining from duel.

In 1841 Nicholas I bestowed the palace to his son Alexander for his wedding, quarter-century later the palace was granted by Alexander II to his son Alexander III. Being afraid of terror attacks to the Winter Palace, Alexander III preferred to stay at the Anichkov Palace and made it his official residence. At that time a blank wall was constructed from the side of the square.

Following the October revolution, the Bolshevik government nationalized the Anichkov palace and designated it the Saint Petersburg City Museum. Since 1925 the palace was closed. In 1934 it was decided to establish "The Palace of Pioneers" there, and after the reconstruction on February 12th, 1937 it was opened. During the Great Patriotic War there was a surgical hospital at the palace. It functioned the first winter during the Siege of Leningrad and housed a lot of wounded people. In the spring 1942 the hospital was moved out of the palace, and ‘The Palace of Pioneers’ welcomed pioneers of Leningrad again.

1 km, 467 m
5
The Pushkin Apartment Museum

The Pushkin Apartment Museum

Saint Petersburg, nab. reki Moiki, 12

The Pushkin Apartment Museum is a memorial museum dedicated to the last period of Alexander Pushkin’s life and creative work. It is located in one of the oldest stone mansions in St. Petersburg at 12, River Moika Embankment which used to belong to the noble Volkonsky family

In September 1836 Pushkin rented a flat on the ground floor of Volkonsky’s house and lived there for four months till he died on February 10 (January 29 old style), 1837, after he had been mortally wounded at the duel. Since 1925, when the apartment officially became a museum, the tradition established to pay homage to the poet’s memory on the day of his death. Citizens of St. Petersburg, representatives of scientific and creative intelligentsia, the city administration and Pushkin’s descendants come to the courtyard of the house to attend a meeting, and at 2.45 P.M., when Pushkin’s heart ceased beating, the moment of silence is observed.

At present, the Museum features the poet’s apartment recreated to its primary state after the drawing of the poet Vasily Zhukovsky, historical documents and recollections of Pushkin’s friends. On display are unique memorial objects that belonged to the poet’s family, friends and contemporaries. The main room of the apartment is Pushkin’s working study. Many things there remember the touch his hands.

In the basement of the Museum building one can find the Introductory Exhibition informing about the history of the house, the life of Alexander Pushkin in Petersburg in 1836, the history of his last duel, and the response of the contemporaries on Pushkin’s death.

Price of tickets for individual visitors:

Adults 120 roubles + audio-guide 190 roubles
Students 30 roubles + audio-guide 190 roubles
Children under 16 years free + audio-guide 190 roubles

AUDIO-GUIDE (Russian, English, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Finnish, or Chinese) is required for all categories of individual visitors.
Admission to the Pushkin Apartment Museum with an AUDIO-GUIDE is until 4:45 pm

Guided group tour of the Museum (with advanced booking):

1–10 people — 3600 roubles
11–20 people — 7200 roubles

Non-professional photography and video shooting of the museum interiors are allowed with a special permit. Permits can be purchased at the ticket office of the Museum
Photo and video permits — 200 roubles

Free entrance: 10 February (The Pushkin Memorial Day), 18 May (International Museum Day), 6 June (The Pushkin Day of Russia)

2 km, 226 m
6
The Rostral Columns

The Rostral Columns

St. Petersburg, Vasilievsky Ostrov, Birzhevaya Ploschad

In the 18th century the columns fulfiled the role of lighthouses

The first two rostrum columns, Chesmenskaya and Moreiskaya, were built in the 1770s at Tsarskoe Selo (near Pushkin) in memory of the victories of the Russian fleet (see Russian Naval Memorials). In St. Petersburg there are two rostral columns erected from granite and pudost stone in 1805-10 (architect Jean-Francois Thomas de Thomon) on the spit of Vasilyevsky Island (see also Stock Market Square). From the very start they served as beacons for the trading port. Inside the rostral columns are spiral staircases, leading to the squares are chalice shaped lamps on tripods (since 1957 the gas beacons of the columns have been lit for celebrations). At the pedestal of the columns are sculptures (the craftsman S. Sukhanov, the sculptors J. Camberlain and J. Thibaud), they are traditionally considered allegories for the Volga and Dnepr rivers (the northern column), the Neva and Volkhov (the southern column). In 1999-2000, they were restored.

1 km, 1 m
7
Berth «Universitetskaya embankment, 3»

Berth «Universitetskaya embankment, 3»

St. Petersburg, Universitetskaya embankment, 3

Situated near cultural and leisure sights of St.Petersburg such as Rumyantsev Square and Russian Academy of Arts

 

None
472 m
8
2 km, 53 m
9

Useful information

The route is provided by the Driver shipping company. Official website: www.driver-river.ru