Alongside Bolshaya Morskay St.

The street has appeared in the 18th century and its history is bound up to the city

The street was constructed in the early 18th century, in Morskaya settlement (hence the name). Until the middle of 18th century, the section up to Nevsky Prospect, with only its left side built up, remained a part of Bolshaya Lugovaya Street that ran from Millionnaya Street to Nevsky Prospect. In the 1760s, its right side was built up. In 1834, this lot was added to Morskaya Bolshaya Street. After fires of 1736-37, the main part of the street from Nevsky Prospect towards St. Isaac's Square was called Bolshaya Gostinaya (Gostinnaya) Street due to the project of Gostiny Dvor construction (has not been implemented). In 1755-67, the street between Nevsky Prospect and Kirpichny Lane was blocked up with the temporary wooden Winter Palace. In the early 19th century, the name Morskaya Bolshaya Street again became firmly established.

  • points of interest 7 ,
  • museums 1
1 km, 164 m
Russian Bank of Commerce and Industry

Russian Bank of Commerce and Industry

St. Petersburg, Bolshaya Morskaya ul., 15

A sample of XX century architcture 

A joint-stock commercial bank, opened in 1890. It was among the largest banks by 1914, its volume of transactions was high enough for the bank to rank 5th in the nation. The bank had 111 branches. Its major activities included granting credit and loans and distributing securities, as well as financing industries such as sugar production, cement industry, and - to a lesser extent - metallurgy, machine-building, and others. The bank cooperated closely with the Russian-Asian Bank from 1912. It also had close links to foreign capital, especially to British capital. The bank was located at 27 Bolshaya Konyushennaya Street until it moved to its own building at 15 Bolshaya Morskaya Street in 1915. The building was constructed by architect M. M. Peretyatkovich in 1912-15. It was nationalized after October 1917.

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The Faberge Store

The Faberge Store

St. Petersburg, Bolshya Morskaya ul., 24

Faberge Company is a jewelry company, founded in 1842 by Gustav Faberge, master of diamond business (1814-94). The Company was located at Bolshaya Morskaya Street; before 1854 at No.11; in 1854-1900 at No.16; and from 1900 – at No. 24 (House of Faberge; 1899-1900, architect K. K. Schmidt).

109 m
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The Vneshtorgbank building

The Vneshtorgbank building

St. Petersburg, Bolshya Morskaya ul., 29

The history of the building stems from 1740 when it was the house of accountant Obuhov.

In the 19th century the building was subject to many remodellings.

Finally in 1980 the building was disassembled down to rock bottom and renewed according to the plan of R.B. Berngard, the architect.

147 m
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Demidov's Houses

Demidov's Houses

St. Petersburg, Bolshaya Morskaya ul., 43

DEMIDOV’S HOUSES (43-45 Bolshaya Morskaya Street), architectural monuments. Two houses situated on these plots were built in the 1740s, and in 1835-40, reconstructed by architect A.A. Montferrand for P.N. Demidov, who was a mine owner. The facade of the three-storied house No 43 is decorated with elements of the Baroque. The ground floor is rusticated, the upper ones are decorated with pilasters. Marble atlantes and caryatids support a large balcony, over which marble figures of Glory hold a cartouche with the owner's coat of arms (sculptor T. Jacque). Architect G.A. Bosse and artist A. Vigi participated in designing the interiors. The main hall was decorated with malachite (columns, fireplace), the rest, with gilt fretwork and chasing. In 1875-1911, the house belonged to Princes N.F. Liven and used to be one of the centres for Baptist promulgation. In 1911, the Italian embassy moved in, and the officers took with them the malachite interior decorations in 1918. Today, Baltic Bank is situated in the building. The house No 45 consists of two wings: the single-storey wing on the right is decorated by columns and reliefs, the three-storied wing on the left is decorated with a terrace with busts in it. In 1873-74, the interiors were partly reconstructed (architect M.E. Messmacher, I.V. Strom). The decorations of a white marble staircase, Oak hall and other rooms have been preserved. In 1923-32, poet N.A. Klyuev lived in the yard wing. Currently, the department of the Union of Composers is situated in the building.

409 m
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Princess Gagarina House

Princess Gagarina House

St. Petersburg, Bolshaya Morskaya ul., 45

Two houses situated on these plots were built in the 1740s, and in 1835-40, reconstructed by architect A.A. Montferrand - one for P.N. Demidov, another for princess Gagarina. The house No 45 consists of two wings: the single-storey wing on the right is decorated by columns and reliefs, the three-storied wing on the left is decorated with a terrace with busts in it. In 1873-74, the interiors were partly reconstructed (architect M.E. Messmacher, I.V. Strom). The decorations of a white marble staircase, Oak hall and other rooms have been preserved. In 1923-32, poet N.A. Klyuev lived in the yard wing. Currently, the department of the Union of Composers is situated in the building.

35 m
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The Nabokov Museum

The Nabokov Museum

St. Petersburg, Bolshaya Morskaya ul., 47

Nabokov called it "the only home in the world"

The museum occupies the first floor, where the former dining room, the drawing room and the library room have retained much of their original look. The former "committee" room where the original interior has not survived is now used as the exhibition hall. In addition to its everyday work , the museum conducts academic programs, among them annual Nabokov Readings in April, summer school for students, international Nabokov conferences, as well as public lectures, seminars and literary readings.
Since 2008, when the Museum became part of the St.Petersburg State University, we not only significantly increased the collection but also started the long-awaited restoration of the rooms.

The Nabokov Museum was opened in 1998 as a non-governmental cultural institution. Since 2008 the museum is a division of the St. Petersburg State University Faculty of Philology and Arts. When the museum was first opened there were very few things in the museum collection. However, over the years the Museum has accumulated a significant collection and a large library which is always open to the visitors.

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Polovtsov House

Polovtsov House

St. Petersburg, Bolshaya Morskaya ul., 52

This place is also called the House of Architect

POLOVTSOV HOUSE (52 Bolshaya Morskaya Street), an architectural monument of Neoclassicism and Eclecticism. Since the 1710s the site belonged to chancellor G.I. Golovkin, whose son built a manor on it. In 1804, the house was bought by Count P.I. Gagarin and totally reconstructed in 1835-1836 (architect A.H. Pehl). The main detail of the austere two-storied building is a balcony-bay window. In 1864, the house was acquired by Baron A.L. Stieglitz, who presented it to his son-in-law, A.A. Polovtsov (hence the name). In the second half of the 19th century new interiors were created and the outbuildings were reconstructed. The works were supervised by architects F.I. Eppinger (1858), G.E. Bosse (1850s), N.F. Bryullov (1870-74), L.L. Peterson (1875-85), L.H. Marschner (1880-90s). In 1888-92 architect M.E. Messmacher carried out the reconstruction of facades overlooking the courtyard, remodelled interiors of the first floor and portraits room (now a library) on the second floor, attached a second storey, where a gala bronze hall, decorated with bronze panels, moulding, marble and tapestries were hung. The marble entrance staircase (architect Pehl) and oak hall (architect Bryullov) are also worth special mention. Under Polovtsov the house was a centre of St. Petersburg cultural life. In the 1920s, it was adjusted to accommodate a trade union school, since 1934 it has hosted the Architect's House. In the 1980s large-scale reconstruction works was carried out.

138 m
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Postal Workers' Club

Postal Workers' Club

St. Petersburg, Bolshaya Morskaya ul., 58

The building historically was the St. Peter’s German Reformed Church

An architectural monument constructed in 1862-65, for the needs of the German Reformatory community by architect G. A. Bosse. The church with a high two-tier bell-tower was done in a pseudo-Romanesque style. The prayer hall with two tiers of windows was located on the second floor and could hold up to 1,000 people. On the first floor there was a school and the pastor's flat. In 1872, the church suffered extensive fire damage; in 1872-74 it was restored without any considerable alteration to the design (architect K. K. Rachau). Around 1900, the windows were adorned with stained-glass patterns by artist E. Tode. In 1917, the congregation of the cathedral numbered about 4,000 people. In 1929, the church was closed down. In 1932-40, it was rebuilt to accommodate the Postal Workers' Club (architects P. M. Grinberg, G. S. Rayts).

127 m
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