Emperor Alexander II

The route will guide you through the places that saved memories about the times of Alexander II reign

Alexander was the most successful Russian reformer since Peter the Great. His most important achievement was the emancipation of serfs in 1861, for which he became known as Alexander the Liberator. The tsar was responsible for numerous other reforms including reorganizing the judicial system, setting up elected local judges, abolishing capital punishment, promoting local self-government through the zemstvo system, imposing universal military service, ending some of the privileges of the nobility, and promoting the universities. Despite these reforms, during his reign, his brutal secret police, known as the Third Section, sent thousands of dissidents into exile in Siberia.

  • points of interest 2 ,
  • parks 1 ,
  • temples and cathedrals 1 ,
  • exhibition halls 1 ,
  • palaces 2
11 km, 174 m
Small Marble Palace

Small Marble Palace

St. Petersburg, Gagarinskaya ul., 3

For some time the palace belonged to the wife of Alexander II, princess Dolgorukova

This palace, built between 1857 and 1862 is the second palace in Saint Petersburg, after the Marble Palace, to have a façade entirely covered in marble. 

It is well-known for its Louis XIV main stairs considered as a marvel. Originally there were mirrors facing the five arched windows. The rooms are decorated in Louis XIV, Louis XV and Louis XVI styles. 

After having several owners, the Small Marble Palace now belongs to the European University of Saint Petersburg (private post-graduate education).

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Summer Garden

Summer Garden

Saint Petersburg, nab. Kutuzova, 2

The Summer Garden is one of the places where one can feel the atmosphere of Peter's times

The garden with a collection of sculptures and the Summer Palace that was the first Emperor's residence constitute a single museum complex. 

The Summer Garden is a pearl in the garden necklace of Petersburg. Peter I really liked this garden. It was laid out in 1704. Time has changed the garden a lot. However, its original planning still remains. 

Peter I wanted the garden of his residence to be as beautiful as the famous gardens of European monarchs. To decorate the Summer Garden he commissioned marble busts and statues from Italy. This purchase laid the foundation of the collection of sculpture of European level.

The fence on the Neva side of the Summer Garden is an architectural masterpiece of universal fame. The impressive monumentality merges miraculously with lightness, simplicity, and grace.

1 km, 10 m
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Church of the Savior on Spilled Blood

Church of the Savior on Spilled Blood

St. Petersburg, Griboedova canal embankment, 2, lit. b

This church was built on the site where tsar Alexander II was assassinated

This Church was built on the site where Emperor Alexander II was severely wounded and died in March 1881.The church was built from 1883 till 1907. The construction was funded by the imperial family.

Architecturally, the Cathedral differs from St. Petersburg's other structures. The Church contains over 7500 square meters of mosaics—according to its restorers, more than any other church in the world. The walls and ceilings inside the Church are completely covered in intricately detailed mosaics — the main pictures being biblical scenes or figures — but with very fine patterned borders setting off each picture.

889 m
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Mikhailovsky Manege

Mikhailovsky Manege

St. Petersburg, Manezhnaya sq. 2

St.Petersburg's oldest expo center

The first exhibitions took place in the middle of the XIX century.

Now "Michailovsky Manege" is a quite modern exhibition complex, the floor place is more than 4356 sq.m There are a conference hall and a restaurant for 100 and 50 people respectively.

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Anichkov Palace

Anichkov Palace

St. Petersburg, Nevsky pr., 39 A

Anichkov Palace is a former imperial palace at the intersection of Nevsky Avenue and the Fontanka River

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 Winter Palace

Winter Palace

St. Petersburg, Dvortsovaya pl., 2

The Winter Palace is a former imperial palace, at present is a part of the Main Museum Complex of the Hermitage

The elegant, monumental palace is a striking monument of the Baroque style in mid-18th-century Russian art. The palace is a brilliant example of the synthesis of architecture and decorative plastic art. All the facades are embellished by a two-tier colonnade. Forming a complex rhythm of verticals, the columns soar upwards, and this motion embraces the numerous statues and vases on the roof. The abundance of moulded decoration - fanciful cornices and window architraves, mascarons, cartouches, rocailles, and a variety of pediments - creates an extremely rich play of light and shade that invest the building's appearance with magnificence.

Developing upon one and the same architectural motif, Rastrelli gave each of the four facades of the palace a different structural rhythm. The southern facade, overlooking the square, has a formal grandeur. Here the architect pierced the building with three arches to create a grand entrance into the courtyard and accentuated it with the vertical elements of paired columns. The majestic northern facade, giving the impression of an endless colonnade, faces the broad expanse of the Neva. The western facade, across from the Admiralty, is reminiscent of the composition of a countryside palace with a small courtyard. The monumental eastern facade with its massive side blocks forming a large cour d'honneur is turned to Millionnaya Street, where the mansions of the nobility stood.

For 150 years the palace served as an imperial residence. In November 1917, after the October Revolution, it was declared a museum. The exhibition placed in the palace includes grand halls and chambers, collections of the antiquities of Eurasia and the East, as well as collections of European and Eastern paintings, sculptures, and decorative art works.

Ticket price — 600 roubles

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Russian Academy of Arts

Russian Academy of Arts

St. Petersburg, Universitetskaya nab., 17

Museum of the Russian Academy of Arts is a unique art collection not only in Russia, but throughout the world

The Russian Academy of Arts in Saint Petersburg, informally known as the St. Petersburg Academy of Arts, was founded in 1757 by Ivan Shuvalov under the name Academy of the Three Noblest Arts. Catherine the Great renamed it the Imperial Academy of Arts and commissioned a new building, completed 25 years later in 1789 by the Neva River. The academy promoted the neoclassical style and technique, and sent its promising students to European capitals for further study. Training at the academy was virtually required for artists to make successful careers.

Formally abolished in 1918 after the Russian Revolution, the academy was renamed several times. It introduced free tuition; students from across the country competed fiercely for its few places annually. In 1947 the national institution was moved to Moscow, and much of its art collection was moved to the Hermitage. The building in Leningrad was devoted to the Ilya Repin Leningrad Institute for Painting, Sculpture and Architecture, named in honor of one of Russia's foremost realist artists. Since 1991 it has been called the St. Petersburg Institute for Painting, Sculpture and Architecture.

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