The epoch of Nicolas I

The route will guide you through the times of Nicolas I reign. You can learn more about him by getting acquainted with architectural monument that cherish memories of those times.

  • squares 1 ,
  • monuments 1 ,
  • palaces 2
4 km, 999 m
Monument to Nikolay I

Monument to Nikolay I

St. Petersburg, Isaakiyevskaya Square

The 11th emperor Vserossiysky, the third son of the emperor Pavel I and Maria Fyodorovna; began reign with Decembrist uprising suppression.

The monument is located on St Isaac's Square. The Neo-Baroque monument to the Russian Emperor Nicholas I was designed by architect Auguste de Montferrand in 1856. The pedestal is decorated with allegorical female figures of Wisdom, Force, Faith and Justice, in whose faces one can notice the likeness with the wife and daughters of the Empereros. High reliefs on the pedestal represent the most important events of the time of Nikolas I's ruling: the Decembrist uprising (1825), suppression of cholera revolt on Sennaya Square (1831), Speransky's rewarding concerning the creation of the first code of laws (1832) and Verebyinsky Bridge opening on the railroad from St. Petersburg to Moscow (1851).

The monument to Nikolay I is erected on the same axis with the well-known Bronze Horseman, the tsars look outward in the same direction, they are separated only by St. Isaac's Cathedral building.Due to this fact, some sayings in St. Petersburg folklore were creatded. For example: "The fool follows the clever man but  "Isaaky" (People call so the cathedral, for shortl) prevents him".

Please, pay your attention at the lanterns near the monument, they are among the most beautiful ones in the city.

1
Anichkov Palace

Anichkov Palace

St. Petersburg, Nevsky pr., 39 A

Anichkov Palace is a former imperial palace at the intersection of Nevsky Avenue and the Fontanka River

2 km, 490 m
2
Palace square

Palace square

St. petersburg, Dvortsovaya pl.

The main square of Saint-Petersburg

One of the most beautiful and harmonious ensembles of architecture in the world, Palace Square remains the main public space of St. Petersburg throughout nearly three centuries.

Palace Square was laid out in 1819-1829 by Carlo Rossi, a neoclassicist architect of Italian descent who designed a large number of streets and squares in St. Petersburg. The picturesque Baroque Winter Palace (built in 1754-62) stands on the northern side of the square. Across the square, on the southern side, there is a classical yellow-and-white General Staff building (built in 1819-29 by Carlo Rossi). This building encircles the Southern side of the square and through its central arch, designed as a Triumphal Arch of the Classical World, you can reach Nevsky Prospect. On the eastn side the building of the former Royal Guards' General Staff tastefully closes the panorama of Palace Square, while on the West the square borders with the Admiralty and the Admiralty Garden.

Many significant events took place here, including the Bloody Sunday massacre in 1905 and the October Revolution in 1917.

Today the enormous square is more peaceful. Locals often gather here and tourists gaze at the architectural delights or stand in line to get to the Hermitage. Political rallies and official ceremonies still take place here, although today you're more likely to see a concert or festival here.

1 km, 826 m
3
 Winter Palace

Winter Palace

St. Petersburg, Dvortsovaya pl., 2

The Winter Palace is a former imperial palace, at present is a part of the Main Museum Complex of the Hermitage

The elegant, monumental palace is a striking monument of the Baroque style in mid-18th-century Russian art. The palace is a brilliant example of the synthesis of architecture and decorative plastic art. All the facades are embellished by a two-tier colonnade. Forming a complex rhythm of verticals, the columns soar upwards, and this motion embraces the numerous statues and vases on the roof. The abundance of moulded decoration - fanciful cornices and window architraves, mascarons, cartouches, rocailles, and a variety of pediments - creates an extremely rich play of light and shade that invest the building's appearance with magnificence.

Developing upon one and the same architectural motif, Rastrelli gave each of the four facades of the palace a different structural rhythm. The southern facade, overlooking the square, has a formal grandeur. Here the architect pierced the building with three arches to create a grand entrance into the courtyard and accentuated it with the vertical elements of paired columns. The majestic northern facade, giving the impression of an endless colonnade, faces the broad expanse of the Neva. The western facade, across from the Admiralty, is reminiscent of the composition of a countryside palace with a small courtyard. The monumental eastern facade with its massive side blocks forming a large cour d'honneur is turned to Millionnaya Street, where the mansions of the nobility stood.

For 150 years the palace served as an imperial residence. In November 1917, after the October Revolution, it was declared a museum. The exhibition placed in the palace includes grand halls and chambers, collections of the antiquities of Eurasia and the East, as well as collections of European and Eastern paintings, sculptures, and decorative art works.

Ticket price — 600 roubles

525 m
4