Anglotourismo

• live English speaking guide

• excursion along rivers and canals

Observation hop on/hop off tour in English with a professional English speaking guide. The ticket last till the end of the day.

The cruiser will take you through Fontanka river, Neva river and Kronverskiy strait around Peter and Paul fortress till the point of departure.

There are three quays along the route: Anichkov bridge, Lomonosov’s bridge, Winter canal where you can get off for a walk and then change for the next suitable cruiser.

Let’s imagine how it will happen…

Fontanka river. On the both banks of Fontanka river you’ll palaces of Saint Petersburg aristocracy: Sheremetyev’s palace, which was given as a gift for the reclamation of swampy lands from Peter the Great, as well as Anichkov palace of Russian Royal family, Beloselsky-Belozersky palace, Derzhavin’s museum estate and the commercial apartment buildings of the 19th century, Ciniselli circus and Fabergé museum.

Grand Neva river: From Moyka river cruiser will sail to Winter canal, signature place of Saint Petersburg, where the fragment of the last winter palace of Peter the Great and the unique atmosphere of that era remain preserved. Then you will find yourself in the Grand Neva river aquatorium, from the broadsides of the ship you will gaze upon imperial Saint Petersburg. This is the view at luxurious palaces and estates on the embankment of Neva river.

You will see the Hermitage, the first museum of the city - the Kunstkamera, the Rostral columns on the Spit of Vasilyevsky Island and the main monument of the city - the Bronze Horseman.

Along Kronveskiy strait the cruiser will take you around Hare island, the place of Saint Petersburg foundation. You will see Peter and Paul fortress from all the quarters, its 6 ravelins and bulwarks.

And Fontanka river again.

In the end of your journey the cruiser will sail past Summer Garden and Summer palace of Peter the Great, the tiniest and beloved monument of Tschizhik-Pyshik and St. Michael’s Castle of Pavel the First.

You journey will take place in any weather conditions – cruisers have decks and comfortable glazed interior spaces.

Overall duration of the journey is 1 hour 30 minutes.

 

  

  • points of interest 2 ,
  • theaters 1 ,
  • palaces 4 ,
  • museums 1 ,
  • berths 1 ,
  • monuments 2
Old Saint Petersburg Stock Exchange

Old Saint Petersburg Stock Exchange

The Spit of Vasilyevsky Island

The main building in the architectural complex of The Spit of Vasilyevsky Island

The building, which is situated at Birzhevaya Ploschad 4, is a significant example of the Greek Revival architecture. Designed by French architect Thomas de Thomon and inspired by the Greek Temple of Hera at Paestum, the stock exchange was constructed between 1805 and 1810. It was built for the St. Petersburg Stock Exchange, but was subsequently used for a different purpose. As of 2011 the building houses the exposition of the Central Naval Museum.

The Old Stock Exchange is sited to fill the majestic sweep of the Spit (in Russian Strelka) of Vasilievsky Island, just opposite the Winter Palace. Thomon's design called for a peristyle of forty four Doric columns resting upon a massive stylobate of red granite and supporting an entablature of triglyphs and slotted metopes. A monumental sculptural group similar in form to aquadriga featuring Neptune, and symbolizing maritime commerce, is mounted above the portico. Both inside and outside the Bourse, a motif of the semicircle is recurrent. The interior features a large colonnaded trading hall, now divided into eight exhibition halls. The central rooms are illuminated by an oblong skylight. The surrounding ceiling features double-sunk coffers.

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The Rostral Columns

The Rostral Columns

St. Petersburg, Vasilievsky Ostrov, Birzhevaya Ploschad

In the 18th century the columns fulfiled the role of lighthouses

The first two rostrum columns, Chesmenskaya and Moreiskaya, were built in the 1770s at Tsarskoe Selo (near Pushkin) in memory of the victories of the Russian fleet (see Russian Naval Memorials). In St. Petersburg there are two rostral columns erected from granite and pudost stone in 1805-10 (architect Jean-Francois Thomas de Thomon) on the spit of Vasilyevsky Island (see also Stock Market Square). From the very start they served as beacons for the trading port. Inside the rostral columns are spiral staircases, leading to the squares are chalice shaped lamps on tripods (since 1957 the gas beacons of the columns have been lit for celebrations). At the pedestal of the columns are sculptures (the craftsman S. Sukhanov, the sculptors J. Camberlain and J. Thibaud), they are traditionally considered allegories for the Volga and Dnepr rivers (the northern column), the Neva and Volkhov (the southern column). In 1999-2000, they were restored.

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Anichkov Palace

Anichkov Palace

St. Petersburg, Nevsky pr., 39 A

Anichkov Palace is a former imperial palace at the intersection of Nevsky prospekt and the Fontanka River. The oldest building on Nevsky Prospekt that survived until today, it took its name from the nearby Anichkov Bridge

The construction of the Palace commenced in 1741, under the orders of the Empress Elizabeth I who just started reign the state after the latest palace coup. The project of the various-story building, the form of which was similar to letter ‘H’ (‘N’ in Cyrillic alphabet) was developed by one of the most renowned architects in the Russian capital Mikhail Zemtsov. The building works were finished in baroque style upon the guidance of Bartolomeo Rastrelli.

Back then, Fontanka used to be the outskirts of the city, Nevsky Prospekt was a branch trial. So, it was necessary to erect a mesmerizing construction that could adorn the entrance to the capital. There was a special channel with a small pond at the entrance to the palace dug out near Fontanka. That accounts for the unique location of the palace which is situated sideways to Nevsky Prospect. The palace with its beautiful garden, fountains and flowerbeds which resembled the Palace in Peterhof, was presented by the Empress Elizabeth I to her favorite (and likely spouse), Aleksey Razumovsky. Thereafter, the palace used to be a nice wedding present for aristocrats. After the Empress Catherine II’s enthronement, the palace reverted to the crown – the Empress bought the Anichkov Palace from Alexey’s brother Kirill and later donated the palace to her closest favorite Prince Grigory Potemkin. Another part of her present was 100 thousand roubles for fitting out the palace ‘to his own taste’. As a result, the palace undergone reconstruction in 1776-1778 supervised by the architect Starov and turned into a great example of the classical architecture in a strict sense. The building was renewed and considerably altered: for instance, various-story structure as well as stucco decorations were eliminated, and the pond was covered up with sand.

At the end of the XVIII century the palace was restored to the crown and adapted to accommodate Her Imperial Majesty's Cabinet. Later, though, the Imperial Cabinet occupied the new building which was erected on Fontanka Embankment along Nevsky Prospect by Quarenghi. Quarenghi’s construction obstructed the overview of the palace from Anichkov Bridge.

Alexander I bestowed the palace on his sister, Grand Duchess Ekaterina Pavlovna of Russia and her groom Prince Friedrich Ludwig of Mecklenburg-Schwerin as a wedding present. The future Russian Emperor Nicholas I moved into the palace in 1817. At that time, Carlo Rossi supervised architectural re-planning and reconstruction of the interiors of the palace. He also instilled the palace and its garden into a grand architectural ensemble on Alexandrinsky Square (now known as Ostrovskogo Square). After Nicholas I ascended the throne, he often stayed at Anichkov Palace. It was also a place where royal balls and banquets were held. In 1837, at the year when the Winter Palace was being reconstructed after the fire, august family was living in the Anichkov Palace for a while. After the Emperor’s death in 1855, the palace was renamed ‘Nikolaevsky’ but locals kept on calling it ‘Anichkov’. The palace was home for the future Emperor Alexander II, the son of Nicholas I who was educated and brought up by the Russian poet Zhukovsky, Pushkin’s friend. Speaking of, Zhukovsky had his own flat in the palace. He also taught Russian to the Empress Aleksandra Fyodorovna. On October 23, 1836 the poet Alexander Pushkin was invited to Imperial audience, where Nicholas I insisted on his refraining from duel.

In 1841 Nicholas I bestowed the palace to his son Alexander for his wedding, quarter-century later the palace was granted by Alexander II to his son Alexander III. Being afraid of terror attacks to the Winter Palace, Alexander III preferred to stay at the Anichkov Palace and made it his official residence. At that time a blank wall was constructed from the side of the square.

Following the October revolution, the Bolshevik government nationalized the Anichkov palace and designated it the Saint Petersburg City Museum. Since 1925 the palace was closed. In 1934 it was decided to establish "The Palace of Pioneers" there, and after the reconstruction on February 12th, 1937 it was opened. During the Great Patriotic War there was a surgical hospital at the palace. It functioned the first winter during the Siege of Leningrad and housed a lot of wounded people. In the spring 1942 the hospital was moved out of the palace, and ‘The Palace of Pioneers’ welcomed pioneers of Leningrad again.

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Beloselsky-Belozersky Palace

Beloselsky-Belozersky Palace

Saint Petersburg, Nevsky pr., 41

The Palace of Beloselskyh-Belozerskyh is a luxury and well-known palace located on Nevsky prospekt at its intersection with Fontanka River

Among the numerous architectural monuments that are located on Nevsky prospekt, one of the most notable is the palace of the Dukes Belosyskie-Belozerskie. It was built in 1848 by the famous architect of the Nicholas I era - A.I. Stakenschneider. The design of the building was presented to the emperor and he approved it. The built palace delighted the contemporaries. It was called «majestic palazzo» and «perfection in its own kind», and it was also written that Starkenschneider «made a true artistic feat». The Palace of the Dukes Belosyskie-Belozerskie became the last private palace built on Nevsky prospekt in the 19th century.

The first owners of the palace were representatives of the oldest princely clan, leading from Vladimir Monomah - Belosyskie-Belozerskie. Many of them were military personnel, diplomats and held important positions at the royal court. The gala events, arranged by the princes in their own palace in Nevsky, were famous for their scope and luxury. By their magnificence, they were compared to the imperial receptions at Winter Palace. The princes Belosyskie-Belozerskie were fond of music, theatre, literature, and collected art collections (paintings, porcelain, silver), which decorated the halls of the palace.

At the end of the 19th century, the palace was acquired by the son of Emperor Alexander II, Grand Duke Sergey Alexandrovich, on the occasion of his marriage to Princess Ella of Hesse (Grand Duchess Elisabeth Fedorovna). In 1911, the owner of the palace, Elizabeth Fedorovna, gave the palace to her nephew, Grand Duke Dmitriy Pavlovich (later known as the one implicated in the murder of Grigory Rasputin).

After the October Revolution of 1917 the building was nationalized. During the Soviet period, various public organizations were housed here, and the main tenant was the Communist Party of Kuibyshevsky District. During the blockade, the building was damaged by bombardment and shelling. After the war restoration work was carried out in the palace.

In 1992 St. Petersburg Cultural Centre was located in the palace. Since January 2003, the building has been transferred under the jurisdiction of the Office of the President of Russian Federation. Great attention is now paid to its technical status. Surveys and restoration work are carried out.

The original interior of the palace is preserved, among which the ceremonial halls on the 2nd floor stand out: the Oak Hall (the former library), which was used as a small concert hall, the Art Gallery, the Parade Dining Room, the Beige Lounge, the Mirror ballroom with a beautiful acoustics, since it was originally intended for concerts and is still used as such, the Golden Crimson Drawing Room. In all of these and other halls there is still the art décor of the middle-end-19th century: fireplaces, lamps, stucco, paintings, mirrors, furniture and much more.

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Chizhik-Pyzhik

Chizhik-Pyzhik

Saint Petersburg, Nab. reki Fontanki, 1 Inzhenernyi Most, on the opposite side

One of the smallest statues in Saint Petersburg

It was installed in 1994 on the Fontanka River near the 1st Engineering Bridge, where in 1835, on the initiative of Prince Peter of Oldenburg was founded the Imperial School of Jurisprudence. Students of the school wore uniforms of yellow-green color, which resembled a plumage of chizh (a siskin). So people started calling them by the nickname Chizhik-Pyzhik.

Author of the statute was Georgian screenwriter and director Revaz Gabriadze. It is one of the smallest statues in Saint Petersburg. Its height is 11 centimeters and weight about 5 kilograms. The statue was stolen on a couple of times, but every time the sculpture returned to the place.

According to the belief your desire will come true if you make a wish and throw coin in statue.

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FABERGÉ MUSEUM

FABERGÉ MUSEUM

21, Fontanka River Embankment, St. Petersburg

The world’s largest collection of Carl  Fabergé masterpieces in the Shuvalov Palace of St. Petersburg

The museum holds the world’s largest collection of Carl Fabergé masterpieces and an exceptional of Russian decorative arts, which today contain more than 4000 works and are considered to be one of the best collections in the word.

The most famous items in Fabergé Museum are the nine Easter Eggs created for Alexander III and Nicholas II, the last of the Russian Emperors. These exquisite pieces are not only examples of the highest artistic skill in jewellery, but they are also historic testimonials that give insight into the lives of Russia’s Imperial Family.

The collection includes all the directions in which the House of  Fabergé worked: Objets de Fantaisie, jewellery, silverware, interior and religion objects.

Henrik Wickström (1862-1923) Finnish workmaster at Faberge.

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 Winter Palace

Winter Palace

St. Petersburg, Dvortsovaya pl., 2

The Winter Palace is the former royal palace. Nowadays  it is a part of the main museum complex of the Hermitage

The monumental and elegant Winter Palace built by order of the Empress Elizabeth Petrovna by the architect Francesco Bartolomeo Rastrelli in 1754-1762, is a striking monument of the Baroque style. The palace is a brilliant example of a synthesis of architecture and decorative plastic art. All the facades are embellished by a two-tier colonnade. Forming a complex rhythm of verticals, the columns soar upwards, and this motion embraces the numerous statues and vases on the roof. The abundance of stucco decoration - fanciful surbases and window architraves, mascarons, cartouches, rocailles, and a variety of pediments - creates an extremely rich play of light and shade that invest the building's appearance with magnificence.

Developing upon one and the same architectural motif, Rastrelli gave each of the four facades of the palace a different structural rhythm. The southern facade, overlooking the square, has a formal grandeur. Here the architect pierced the building with three arches to create a grand entrance into the courtyard and accentuated it with the vertical elements of paired columns. The majestic northern facade, giving the impression of an endless colonnade, faces the broad expanse of the Neva. The western facade, across from the Admiralty, is reminiscent of the composition of a countryside palace with a small courtyard. The monumental eastern facade with its massive side blocks forming a large courtyard is turned to Millionnaya Street, where the mansions of the nobility were located.

For 150 years the palace served as an imperial residence. In November 1917 it was declared a museum. The exhibition placed in the palace includes grand halls and chambers, collections of the antiquities of Eurasia and the East, as well as collections of European and Eastern paintings, sculptures, and decorative art works.

Ticket price - 800 rubles

Citizens of the Russian Federation and the Republic of Belarus - 400 rubles

Children, students, pensioners of the Russian Federation - for free

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Marble Palace

Marble Palace

St. Petersburg, Millionnaya ul., 5/1

The palace is a prime example of early classicism architecture

The palace was designed by architect Antonio Rinaldi, whose portrait can be found on a marble bas-relief installed on a sidewall of the main staircase at the palace’s entrance. The portrait’s existence resulted from the request by the original owner of the palace, Count Orlov, who wanted to express his admiration for the talent of the architect. In the middle of the XIX century, the palace was rebuilt according to the project of architect Alexander Bryullov.

The three-storey stone building stands out in the panoramic view of the Palace Embankment with its massiveness and magnificence. The strict beauty of its architectural style is emphasised by the diverse texture and colourfulness of natural stone used in the decoration of its façades and interiors. Pilasters and columns evenly alternate with windows, and thanks to the selection of different types of stone, the whole composition is filled with calm grace.

Different varieties of marble were used during the construction of the palace, mainly from domestic deposits discovered in the 1760s along the shores of Ladoga and Onega lakes. Pink Tivdian marble is used to decorate the clock tower, attic and pilasters, uniting the two upper floors of the building. The window frames are made of grey Ruskeala marble, and the decorative wreaths between the windows of the second and third floors are made of white Ural marble. The plinth part of the building, made of Vyborg pink rapakivi granite, has a beautiful rough texture thanks to special surface treatment.

In front of the eastern façade, there’s a monument to Alexander III by P. P. Trubetskoy, which was mounted on Vosstaniya Square in 1909-1937. To the east of the building there is a monument to A.V. Suvorov by M. I. Kozlovsky on Suvorovskaya Ploshchad'.

A new stage in the life of Marble Palace began in 1992, when it was transferred to the State Russian Museum. Since then, systematic examination and scientific restoration of the unique monument have been carried out.

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New Holland

New Holland

St. Petersburg, nab. Admiralteyskogo kanala., 2

It is a complex of storage facilities situated on the cognominal island

New Holland has a central basin which in 1765 was linked with the Moika River and the Kryukov Canal. The island's perimeter is made up of wooden storage facilities (1732-38, architect I. K. Korobov), where ship timber for the Admiralty Shipyard was dried and stored employing the so-called Dutch technique. This was also where small row boats were built. In 1765-88, an architectural monument, a complex of stone storehouses in the style of early Classicism (architects S. I. Chevansky, I. K. Gerard; facades from 1765, architect J. B. Vallin de la Mothe) was erected along New Holland's southern and eastern sides.

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Mariinsky Theatre

Mariinsky Theatre

St. Petersburg, Тeatralnaya ploschad', 1

One of the biggest and most famous opera and ballet theatres in Russia and all over the world

Mariinsky theatre of opera and ballet was opened in 1860, it became the preeminent music theatre of late 19th century Russia, where many of the stage masterpieces of Tchaikovsky, Mussorgsky, and Rimsky-Korsakov received their premieres. When, in 1859, the Circus Theatre was destroyed by fire, a new theatre was built on the same site, once again by Alberto Cavos. It was named the Mariinsky in honour of Empress Maria Alexandrovna, wife of Alexander II. The first theatre season in the new building opened on 2 October 1860 with A  Life for the Tsar by Glinka under the baton of the Russian Opera Company’s conductor Konstantin Lyadov, father of the renowned composer Anatoly Lyadov. The name of Empress Maria Alexandrovna was immortalized not only in the name of the theatre but also in its emblem - the stage curtain by A. Golovin. This main theater attribute was desined as the train of the Empress's dress.

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Useful information

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